Organ cultures of ciliated epithelium for the study of respiratory viruses.
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Organ cultures of ciliated epithelium for the study of respiratory viruses. [Translated by L. James Brown] by Bertil Hoorn

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Published in Lund .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Epithelium.,
  • Tissue culture.,
  • Virology -- Cultures and culture media.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Akademisk avhandling-Lund.

SeriesActa pathologica, microbiologica et immunologica Scandinavica., 183
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQR360 .H64
The Physical Object
Pagination37 p.
Number of Pages37
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6012542M
LC Control Number66068208
OCLC/WorldCa34247693

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and Fallopian tube ciliated epithelium. Subsequently a number of respiratory viruses were grown in organ cultures of respiratory tissue epithelium (Hoorn, ; Hoorn and Tyrrell, ; Tyrrell and Hoorn, ). The advantage of cultures of this sort is that the functional activity of the ciliated epithelium can be observed as a response.   Harnett GB, Hooper WL. Test-tube organ cultures of ciliated epithelium for the isolation of respiratory viruses. Lancet. Feb 17; 1 ()– [Google Scholar] Higgins PG. The isolation of viruses from acute respiratory infections. V. The use of organ cultures of human embryonic nasal and tracheal ciliated epithelium.   Uninfected cultures kept for up to 7 days showed no structural changes in the cilia or other surface structures. M. hominis multiplied in organ cultures, but not in culture medium without tissue. A practical organ culture technique for the preparation Cited by: The isolation of viruses from acute respiratory infections. V. The use of organ cultures of human embryonic nasal and tracheal ciliated epithelium. Mon Bull Minist Health Public Health Lab Serv. Dec; – Higgins PG, Ellis EM. Further observations on the use of organ cultures in the study of acute respiratory-tract infections.

Hoorn, B.: Organ culture of ciliated epithelium for the study of respiratory viruses. Acta path. microbiol. scand. 66, 1–37 Suppl. (). Google Scholar. A study was made of human influenza A viruses and of recombinants in ring organ cultures of human and ferret tracheas. All these viruses had previously been given to man and their virulence defined by clinical observation. There was an apparent association between the ability to reduce ciliary activity and the ability to produce human disease. Harnett GB, Hooper WL. Test-tube organ cultures of ciliated epithelium for the isolation of respiratory viruses. Lancet. Feb 17; 1 ()– HARTLEY JW, ROWE WP, BLOOM HH, TURNER HC. ANTIBODIES TO MOUSE HEPATITIS VIRUSES IN HUMAN SERA. Proc . The epithelium provides physical barrier to infection, lining the respiratory tract from the nose to the alveoli with a wide range of cell types. 41 Ciliated epithelial cells are important in propelling mucus up the airway, thereby removing particulate material. Ciliated cells line the respiratory tract down to the level of the respiratory.

may behave as a defensive barrier, systems using monolayer cultures of chick- embryo respiratory epithelium, allantois-on-shell and chick-embryo eiliated tracheal organ (CETO) cultures were used to study the effect of ascorbic acid on virus infection. The viruses used were members of the Families Orthomyxoviridae. Abstract. Organ cultures of human embryonic trachea in test tubes were used as an adjunct to tissue cultures in the isolation of respiratory viruses from children in hospital. Fifty-one viruses were obtained from specimens, giving an isolation rate of 40%. Fifteen viruses were isolated from the original tissue cultures and also after passage through organ culture. Hoorn, B. Organ cultures of ciliated epithelium for the study of respiratory viruses. Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Scand. (Suppl. ) 5– Organ cultures of bovine tracheal epithelium were infected with a rhinovirus or a strain of parainfluenza type 3 virus, and the epithelial surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy. When washed free from mucus, normal control cultures showed a thick carpet of normal cilia, whereas the two viruses each produced specific morphological abnormalities.